Beat Depression to Stay Healthier and Live Longer should be considered a key resource for older patients with depression as well as their families and caregivers. This comprehensive yet very accessible book reflects Dr. Moak’s considerable experience as a clinician and educator and provides the reader with the current state of knowledge about late-life depression. Clinical presentation, diagnosis, causes, co-occurrence with other medical conditions, and treatments are clearly and fully covered, supported by dozens of useful case examples.” —David Steffens, MD, MHS, University of Connecticut Health Center

“Written by one of the nation’s foremost clinicians and champions of geriatric mental health, Beat Depression to Stay Healthier and Live Longer delivers on its promise to inform and inspire. It is comprehensive in scope and true to the best science, while also being fun and easy to read. An indispensable guide for families, seniors, students, and practitioners in all geriatric clinical disciplines (not only mental health).” —Charles F. Reynolds, III, MD, UPMC Endowed Professor in Geriatric Psychiatry; Director, UPMC/Pitt Aging Institute

In Beat Depression to Stay Healthier and Live Longer Gary Moak dispels the myths and explains the realities about depression and aging, providing patients and their loved ones clear and practical guidance to help them beat depression and live better longer.” —Gary Small, MD, Director, UCLA Longevity Center and author of The Memory Bible

 

Psych Central  Just as smoking is hazardous to health, so is depression, especially in old age. As a past president of the American Association for Geriatric Psychiatry and an assistant professor of psychiatry at Dartmouth, Moak certainly holds the right credentials to tackle the topic. He divides his footnoted guide into three sections. The first focuses on understanding depression in the elderly, the second covers its effect on health problems such as diabetes and cardiovascular disease, and the third describes what to do. (An example: people with manic depression should take mood stabilizers, not antidepressants.) Moak uses unnamed patients to illustrate conditions such as depression after stroke and reactions such as the all-too-common refusal to get help. Indeed, most older adults with depression don’t get treatment, which is a serious problem because the elderly, especially men over 85, have the highest rate of suicide of any group. He covers myths such as the erroneous belief that mental illness in old age must be senility . . . [T]his is a useful overview which presents a good case for getting treatment.  — Booklist
Many people find the reality of getting older depressing. And depression itself often comes with a stigma. So when we talk about depression and aging combined, what results is a very complicated — and often hard to treat — issue. Gary S. Moak, former president of the American Association for Geriatric Psychiatry, has written a new book to help. Beat Depression to Stay Healthier and Live Longer: A Guide for Older Adults and Their Families combines Moak’s years of experience working with elderly populations with the latest research on depression. . . .[D]epression in older patients can indeed be treated, whether you are in your sixties or nineties [as Moak shows throughout the book.]

 

Booklist Online Reviews:  Just as smoking is hazardous to health, so is depression, especially in old age. As a past president of the American Association for Geriatric Psychiatry and an assistant professor of psychiatry at Dartmouth, Moak certainly holds the right credentials to tackle the topic. He divides his footnoted guide into three sections. The first focuses on understanding depression in the elderly, the second covers its effect on health problems such as diabetes and cardiovascular disease, and the third describes what to do. (An example: people with manic depression should take mood stabilizers, not antidepressants.) Moak uses unnamed patients to illustrate conditions such as depression after stroke and reactions such as the all-too-common refusal to get help. Indeed, most older adults with depression don’t get treatment, which is a serious problem because the elderly, especially men over 85, have the highest rate of suicide of any group. He covers myths such as the erroneous belief that mental illness in old age must be senility. While not groundbreaking, this is a useful overview which presents a good case for getting treatment. — Karen Springen