Dementia, By Any Other Name, is Still Dementia

Have you adopted the DSM-5 nomenclature “major neurocognitive disorder”, or have you continued to use “dementia”, as I have? DSM-5 was released in 2013, introducing neurocognitive disorders, major and minor. In the years since, I’ve noticed that many psychiatrists, but not all, have adopted the new nosology. But other physicians, including primary care physicians and neurologists, and most geriatric psychiatrists, still use “dementia”. And ICD-10 uses the tried and true term “dementia”. Nevertheless, as a medical school faculty member, responsible for the training of medical students, residents, and fellows, I suppose I should toe the DSM-5 line, but I’m not going to do it. It’s a pet peeve.

It’s almost 2017, and you might wonder what took me so longer to get around to expressing my objections to the reclassification of dementia as a neurocognitive disorder. Fair question. Suffice to say I’ve been busy. “What could have been more important this this?” you ask. For one, there’s Medicare, moving target par excellence, source of endlessly changing rules, regulations, and (dis)incentives, and general bane of existence. And then there’s my book, Beat Depression to Stay Healthier and Live Longer: A Guide For Older Adults and Their Families, published earlier this year. It’s a terrific book and easy to read, if I do say so myself. I assure you that nary a page deals with ICD-10, but there is a terrific chapter, suitable for the lay public and clinicians alike, on the differential diagnosis of depression, covering the different types of depression, other conditions that masquerade as depression, and how to tell them apart. Ironically, I used DSM-5 terminology. I’d highly suggest getting a copy: no, not DSM-5, my book! Even before you finish reading this post, you may wish to order it on amazon.com.  You won’t regret buying my book, but, back to DSM-5 and dementia.

First my “minor” major neurocognitive disorder objections. I simply like the term “dementia” better. It’s traditional, having been in use for well over 100 years. Healthcare professionals all know what it refers to, and much of the public does. And it’s shorter and easier to say. “Major neurocognitive disorder” doesn’t exactly roll off the tongue.

And now my “major” major neurocognitive disorder objections. Actually I don’t object to “neurocognitive” for the category of syndromes, generally, but I don’t see the advantage for dementia specifically. True, “neurocognitive” does describe a major aspect of dementia. But is also seems too narrow, the most disruptive and disabling manifestations of dementia being their psychiatric and behavioral complications. And, and the same time, it also seems non-specific, schizophrenia clearly also being a disorder involving severe neurocognitive impairment. Had they asked me, I’d have suggested letting dementia be dementia, and calling the category of disorders “acquired disorders of widespread brain impairment usually first manifest in late life”. Nobody asked me, but, no matter, there’s always DSM-6 to look forward to.

What do you think? Send me a comment, and let’s start a discussion.   If you’d like to receive my online newsletter, please navigate to the contact page and leave your email address.

Tags: , , ,

Comments are closed.